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Superior Court of California - County of San Diego: Juvenile: Juvenile Justice Commission: JJC Membership

Membership


Membership Information

By law, the Commission shall consist of "not less than seven (7) and no more than fifteen (15) citizens. Two or more members shall be persons who are between 14 and 21 years of age, provided there are available persons between 14 and 21 years of age able to carry out the duties of a commission member in a manner satisfactory to the appointing authority" (WIC 225). The San Diego County Juvenile Justice Commission is composed of 15 volunteer members.

A. Appointments:

The Presiding Judge of the Juvenile Court with the concurrence of the Presiding Judge of Superior Court of San Diego County appoints individual citizens for terms of four (4) years to the Juvenile Justice Commission.

B. Meetings:

  1. Regular Meetings: The Commission conducts monthly meetings in executive session on the first Wednesday of the month.
  1. Public Meetings: Quarterly public meetings are noticed and held the third Wednesday of January, April, July and October and begin at 12 noon. The public meetings are conducted in such places within the County of San Diego, as the Commission shall designate.
  1. Special Meetings: Special meetings of the Commission are open to the public and may be set at any time and at any place within the County of San Diego designated in the notice of the special meeting. A special meeting may be called by the Chairperson of the Commission or any three members on 24-hours' written notice, unless such notice is waived by all members of the Commission. The convening authority of the special meeting may close any special meeting of the Commission to the public. Juvenile Justice Commissions are not subject to the Ralph M. Brown Act. They are, in effect, part of the Superior Court and, as such, fall within the exemption from the so-called Secret Meeting Laws for Judicial agencies provided in Section 11121 of the Government Code. (Ref: Opinion No. CV75/29 I.L.)

Important Information for Prospective Commissioners

Commissioners have a unique and rewarding opportunity to inquire into the administration of juvenile court law in San Diego County and to make recommendations to enhance the well-being of children in both the delinquency and dependency systems.


Application and Appointment

A prospective commissioner should become familiar with the mandated and elective activities of the Juvenile Justice Commission of San Diego County (JJC) prior to submitting an application to the JJCs administrative officer. A prospective commissioner may contact the JJC Secretary and request for a current member to contact him/her to answer questions about the role and responsibilities of a commissioner.

The Presiding Judge of the Juvenile Court with the concurrence of the Presiding Judge of San Diego Superior Court appoints individual citizens for terms of four (4) years.


Composition of the Commission

By law, the Commission shall consist of "not less than seven (7) and no more than fifteen (15) citizens. Two or more members shall be persons who are between 14 and 21 years of age, provided there are available persons between 14 and 21 years of age able to carry out the duties of a commission member in a manner satisfactory to the appointing authority" (WIC 225). The JJC is composed of up to 15 volunteer members.


Tasks and Time Commitment

Commissioners will be asked to arrange for their own travel to meetings, inspections, and other activities. Many of the activities in which commissioners must participate occur during traditional business hours (Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm). Prospective commissioners who are employed are encouraged to discuss membership on the JJC with their employer prior to applying to ensure that they will have the flexibility to balance professional obligations and their commitment to the JJC.

Activities that occur during traditional business hours:
  • Regular meetings. The Commission conducts monthly meetings in executive session on the first Wednesday of the month from 12:00pm-1:30pm.
  • Public meetings. Quarterly Public Meetings are noticed and held the third Wednesday of January, April, July and October from Noon 1pm. The public meetings are conducted in such places within the San Diego County, as the Commission shall designate.
  • Special meetings. Special meetings of the Commission are open to the public and may be set at any time and at any place within the County of San Diego designated in the notice of the special meeting. A special meeting may be called by the Chairperson of the Commission or any three members on 24-hours' written notice, unless such notice is waived by all members of the Commission. The convening authority of the special meeting may close any special meeting of the Commission to the public. Juvenile Justice Commissions are not subject to the Ralph M. Brown Act. They are, in effect, part of the Superior Court and, as such, fall within the exemption from the so-called Secret Meeting Laws for Judicial agencies provided in Government Code 11121. (Ref: Opinion No. CV75/29 I.L.)
  • Inspections. Commissioners inspect jail, lock-up, and County juvenile institutions once per year. Typically, each commissioner inspects one jail or lock-up facility and one County juvenile institution. Committee work. Some JJC committees conduct activities during traditional business hours. Examples include observing court proceedings or attending community meetings on the JJCs behalf. Activities that may occur outside of traditional business hours:
  • Report writing. Commissioners must complete detailed reports as part of the process of inspecting facilities. Reviewing inspection reports. Commissioners are asked to review drafts of inspection reports for facilities which they did not inspect.
  • Committee work. Some JJC committees conduct activities which may be completed outside of traditional business hours. Examples include researching juvenile justice issues and reviewing critical incident reports.

Qualifications

Commissioners should:

  • have a personal, professional, and/or academic interest in issues related to children affected by the Juvenile Court.
  • be comfortable working as part of a diverse, multidisciplinary team.
  • have the skills necessary to gather and analyze information objectively; read and understand policies and procedures; read, write, and evaluate written reports; and interview youth and juvenile justice professionals.


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